Unplanned Pregnancy and the Zika Virus (June 2016): Survey Says

Fact Sheet

Unplanned Pregnancy and the Zika Virus (June 2016): Survey Says

Survey Says: Unplanned Pregnancy and the Zika Virus (June 2016)

The Zika virus is appropriately garnering much attention from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others concerned about the nation’s health. Although the illness is usually mild with “symptoms lasting for several days to a week,” Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects.

Despite promising declines in unplanned pregnancy rates in recent years, 45% of pregnancies in the United States are still unplanned. With the CDC watching closely for cases of Zika in the U.S., it’s more important than ever to provide comprehensive access to the full range of birth control methods.

Around 6 in 10 American adults say they know little or nothing about the Zika virus and, of those who know something about the virus, less than half know that Zika can be transmitted through sexual contact, according to the results of a new nationally representative survey of 1,009 adults age 18-45.

Suggested Citation(s)

Power to Decide (formerly The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy). (2016). Survey Says: Unplanned Pregnancy and the Zika Virus. Washington, DC: Author.

June 2016

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