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Federal Policy Action Center

Welcome to the Federal Policy Action Center

Scroll down to find the latest information and how you can take action to support access to high-quality evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention education and contraceptive access.

Advocacy vs. Educating Policymakers: Understanding the Difference 

Federal grantees can advocate (activities such as asking members to take action on legislation, support a particular program funding level, or vote in a specific way) for federal funding; however, they cannot use their federal funds to do so. But, be sure you’re familiar with the rules of your organization; some prohibit advocacy.

If you aren’t able to advocate, that doesn’t mean there is nothing for you to do. You can still do your part to protect the federal programs that are making a difference in your community, by educating members of Congress about the work these programs are doing. Simply sharing information about the great work that the Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program or the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) are supporting in your community is education, not advocacy. If you are advocating, you will have a policy-related “ask,” such as, “Please maintain funding for the evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program for Fiscal Year (FY) 2019.”

To look up your Representative, click here and enter your zip code in the box on the top right. To find your Senators, click here.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

The TPP Program and the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) are complementary federal funding streams for teen pregnancy prevention education. They are high-quality examples of tiered, evidence-based grant making that use evidence to inform awards as well as continuous improvement.

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Personal Responsibility Education Program

The Personal Responsibility Education Program and the Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program are complementary federal funding streams for teen pregnancy prevention education. They are high-quality examples of tiered, evidence-based grant making that use evidence to inform awards as well as continuous improvement.

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Title X Family Planning Program

Along with Medicaid, Title X supports low-income women’s access to birth control.

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Private and Public Contraceptive Coverage

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) strengthened affordable access to contraception by expanding the number of Americans with public (Medicaid) or private health insurance and eliminating cost sharing for contraception.

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Over the past year or so, we've been collecting a story bank of your birth control stories. We've asked you about the barriers you've faced, how the ACA improved your access, and now we want to know why it matters to you? and what it has made possible? Your stories will help us to highlight the continued importance of birth control and the role it plays in giving all young people the power to decide if, when, and under what circumstances to get pregnant and have a child--and ultimately to pursue the future they want, on their own terms.